When asked what was the speed of sound Albert Einstein said

When asked what was the speed of sound Albert Einstein said

When asked what was the speed of sound Albert Einstein said: “[I do not] carry such information in my mind since it is readily available in books.”

“1920s
How much do I love that noble man
More than I could tell with words…
Subtle is the Lord, but malicious He is not.
The theory says a lot, but does not really bring us any closer to the secret of the “”old one.”” I, at any rate, am convinced that He does not throw dice.
Whether you can observe a thing or not depends on the theory which you use. It is the theory which decides what can be observed.
How much do I love that noble man
More than I could tell with words
I fear though he’ll remain alone
With a holy halo of his own.
Poem by Einstein on Spinoza (1920), as quoted in Einstein and Religion by Max Jammer, Princeton UP 1999, p. 43; Original German manuscript “”Zu Spinozas Ethik”” Einstein Archives 31-18.00
We may assume the existence of an aether; only we must give up ascribing a definite state of motion to it, i.e. we must by abstraction take from it the last mechanical characteristic which Lorentz had still left it. … But this ether may not be thought of as endowed with the quality characteristic of ponderable inedia, as consisting of parts which may be tracked through time. The idea of motion may not be applied to it.
On the irrelevance of the luminiferous aether hypothesis to physical measurements, in an address at the University of Leiden (5 May 1920)
I am neither a German citizen, nor do I believe in anything that can be described as a “”Jewish faith.”” But I am a Jew and glad to belong to the Jewish people, though I do not regard it in any way as chosen.
Letter to Central Association of German Citizens of the Jewish Faith, 3 [5] April 1920, as quoted in Alice Calaprice, The Ultimate Quotable Einstein (2010), p. 195; citing Israelitisches Wochenblatt, 42 September 1920, The Collected Papers of Albert Einstein, Vol. 7, Doc. 37, and Vol. 9, Doc 368.
Raffiniert ist der Herrgott, aber boshaft ist er nicht.
Subtle is the Lord, but malicious He is not.
Remark made during Einstein’s first visit to Princeton University. (April 1921)] as quoted in Einstein (1973) by R.W. Clark, Ch. 14. “”God is slick, but he ain’t mean”” is a variant translation of this (1946) Unsourced variant: “”God is subtle but he is not malicious.””
When asked what he meant by this he replied. “”Nature hides her secret because of her essential loftiness, but not by means of ruse.”” (Die Natur verbirgt ihr Geheimnis durch die Erhabenheit ihres Wesens, aber nicht durch List.) As quoted in Subtle is the Lord — The Science and the Life of Albert Einstein (1982) by Abraham Pais einsteinandreligion.com
Originally said to Princeton University mathematics professor Oscar Veblen, May 1921, while Einstein was in Princeton for a series of lectures, upon hearing that an experimental result by Dayton C. Miller of Cleveland, if true, would contradict his theory of gravitation. But the claimed discrepancy was quite small and required special circumstances (hence Einsteins’s remark). The result turned out to be false. Some say by this remark Einstein meant that Nature hides her secrets by being subtle, while others say he meant that nature is mischievous but not bent on trickery. [The Yale Book of Quotations, ed. Fred R. Shapiro, 2006]
Variant translation: God may be sophisticated, but he’s not malicious.
As quoted in Cherished Illusions (2005) by Sarah Stern, p. 109
I have second thoughts. Maybe God is malicious.
Said to Vladimir Bargmann, as quoted in Einstein in America (1985) by Jamie Sayen , indicating that God leads people to believe they understand things that they actually are far from understanding; also in The Yale Book of Quotations (2006), ed. Fred R. Shapiro
When a man after long years of searching chances on a thought which discloses something of the beauty of this mysterious universe, he should not therefore be personally celebrated. He is already sufficiently paid by his experience of seeking and finding. In science, moreover, the work of the individual is so bound up with that of his scientific predecessors and contemporaries that it appears almost as an impersonal product of his generation.
From the story “”The Progress of Science”” in The Scientific Monthly edited by J. McKeen Cattell (June 1921), Vol. XII, No. 6. The story says that the comments were made at the annual meeting of the National Academy of Sciences at the National Museum in Washington on April 25, 26, and 27. Einstein’s comments appear on p. 579, though the story may be paraphrasing rather than directly quoting since it says “”In reply Professor Einstein in substance said”” the quote above.
[I do not] carry such information in my mind since it is readily available in books. …The value of a college education is not the learning of many facts but the training of the mind to think.
In response to not knowing the speed of sound as included in the Edison Test: New York Times (18 May 1921); Einstein: His Life and Times (1947) Philipp Frank, p. 185; Einstein, A Life (1996) by Denis Brian, p. 129; “”Einstein Due Today”” (February 2005) edited by József Illy, Manuscript 25-32 of the Einstein Paper Project; all previous sources as per Einstein His Life and Universe (2007) by Walter Isaacson, p. 299
Unsourced variants: “”I never commit to memory anything that can easily be looked up in a book”” and “”Never memorize what you can look up in books.”” (The second version is found in””Recording the Experience”” (10 June 2004) at The Library of Congress, but no citation to Einstein’s writings is given.)
I was sitting in a chair in the patent office at Bern when all of sudden a thought occurred to me: If a person falls freely he will not feel his own weight. I was startled. This simple thought made a deep impression on me. It impelled me toward a theory of gravitation.
Einstein in his Kyoto address (14 December 1922), talking about the events of “”probably the 2nd or 3rd weeks”” of October 1907, quoted in Why Did Einstein Put So Much Emphasis on the Equivalence Principle? by Dr. Robert J. Heaston in Equivalence Principle – April 2008 (15th NPA Conference) who cites A. Einstein. “How I Constructed the Theory of Relativity,” Translated by Masahiro Morikawa from the text recorded in Japanese by Jun Ishiwara, Association of Asia Pacific Physical Societies (AAPPS) Bulletin, Vol. 15, No. 2, pp. 17-19 (April 2005).
May they not forget to keep pure the great heritage that puts them ahead of the West: the artistic configuration of life, the simplicity and modesty of personal needs, and the purity and serenity of the Japanese soul.
Comment made after a six-week trip to Japan in November-December 1922, published in Kaizo 5, no. 1 (January 1923), 339. Einstein Archive 36-477.1. Appears in The New Quotable Einstein by Alice Calaprice (2005), p. 269.
Quantum mechanics is certainly imposing. But an inner voice tells me that it is not yet the real thing. The theory says a lot, but does not really bring us any closer to the secret of the “”old one.”” I, at any rate, am convinced that He does not throw dice.
Letter to Max Born (4 December 1926); The Born-Einstein Letters (translated by Irene Born) (Walker and Company, New York, 1971) ISBN 0-8027-0326-7.
Einstein himself used variants of this quote at other times. For example, in a 1943 conversation with William Hermanns recorded in Hermanns’ book Einstein and the Poet, Einstein said: “”As I have said so many times, God doesn’t play dice with the world.”” (p. 58)
Whether you can observe a thing or not depends on the theory which you use. It is the theory which decides what can be observed.
Objecting to the placing of observables at the heart of the new quantum mechanics, during Heisenberg’s 1926 lecture at Berlin; related by Heisenberg, quoted in Unification of Fundamental Forces (1990) by Abdus Salam ISBN 0521371406
Try and penetrate with our limited means the secrets of nature and you will find that, behind all the discernible concatenations, there remains something subtle, intangible and inexplicable. Veneration for this force beyond anything that we can comprehend is my religion. To that extent I am, in point of fact, religious.
p.157 London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson
Response to atheist Alfred Kerr in the winter of 1927, who after deriding ideas of God and religion at a dinner party in the home of the publisher Samuel Fischer, had queried him “”I hear that you are supposed to be deeply religious”” as quoted in The Diary of a Cosmopolitan (1971) by H. G. Kessler
Ich glaube an Spinozas Gott, der sich in der gesetzlichen Harmonie des Seienden offenbart, nicht an einen Gott, der sich mit Schicksalen und Handlungen der Menschen abgibt.
Translation: I believe in Spinoza’s God, Who reveals Himself in the lawful harmony of the world, not in a God Who concerns Himself with the fate and the doings of mankind.
24 April 1929 in response to the telegrammed question of New York’s Rabbi Herbert S. Goldstein: “”Do you believe in God? Stop. Answer paid 50 words.”” Einstein replied in only 27 (German) words. The New York Times 25 April 1929
Expanding on this he later wrote: “”I can understand your aversion to the use of the term ‘religion’ to describe an emotional and psychological attitude which shows itself most clearly in Spinoza… I have not found a better expression than ‘religious’ for the trust in the rational nature of reality that is, at least to a certain extent, accessible to human reason.””
As quoted in Einstein : Science and Religion by Arnold V. Lesikar
If A is success in life, then A = x + y + z. Work is x, play is y and z is keeping your mouth shut.
Said to Samuel J Woolf, Berlin, Summer 1929. Cited with additional notes in The Ultimate Quotable Einstein by Alice Calaprice and Freeman Dyson, Princeton UP (2010) p 230″

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