Tobacco companies pay for most, if not all, of the anti-tobacco

Tobacco companies pay for most, if not all, of the anti-tobacco

The Tobacco Master Settlement Agreement (MSA) was entered in November 1998, originally between the four largest United States tobacco companies (Philip Morris Inc., R. J. Reynolds, Brown & Williamson and Lorillard – the original participating manufacturers) and the attorneys general of 46 states. The states settled their Medicaid lawsuits against the cigarette industry for recovery of their tobacco-related health-care costs, and also exempted the companies from private tort liability regarding harm caused by cigarette use.:25 In exchange, the companies agreed to curtail or cease certain cigarette marketing practices, as well as to pay, in perpetuity, various annual payments to the states to compensate them for some of the medical costs of caring for persons with smoking-related illnesses. The money also funds a new anti-smoking advocacy group, called the American Legacy Foundation, that is responsible for such campaigns as The Truth. The settlement also dissolved the tobacco industry groups Tobacco Institute, the Center for Indoor Air Research, and the Council for Tobacco Research. In the MSA, the original participating manufacturers (OPM) agreed to pay a minimum of $206 billion over the first twenty-five years of the agreement.

Tobacco companies pay for most, if not all, of the anti-tobacco

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