Usual rules of court etiquette did not apply to Beethoven

Usual rules of court etiquette did not apply to Beethoven

Beethoven disregarded authority so heavily that after MANY confrontations, Archduke Rudolph decreed that the usual rules of court etiquette did not apply to him

“Beethoven’s personal life was troubled by his encroaching deafness and irritability brought on by chronic abdominal pain (beginning in his twenties) which led him to contemplate suicide (documented in his Heiligenstadt Testament). Beethoven was often irascible. It has been suggested he suffered from bipolar disorder. Nevertheless, he had a close and devoted circle of friends all his life, thought to have been attracted by his strength of personality. Toward the end of his life, Beethoven’s friends competed in their efforts to help him cope with his incapacities.
Sources show Beethoven’s disdain for authority, and for social rank. He stopped performing at the piano if the audience chatted amongst themselves, or afforded him less than their full attention. At soirĂ©es, he refused to perform if suddenly called upon to do so. Eventually, after many confrontations, the Archduke Rudolph decreed that the usual rules of court etiquette did not apply to Beethoven.[89]
Beethoven was attracted to the ideals of the Enlightenment. In 1804, when Napoleon’s imperial ambitions became clear, Beethoven took hold of the title page of his Third Symphony and scratched the name Bonaparte out so violently that he made a hole in the paper. He later changed the work’s title to “”Sinfonia Eroica, composta per festeggiare il sovvenire d’un grand’uom”” (“”Heroic Symphony, composed to celebrate the memory of a great man””), and he rededicated it to his patron, Prince Joseph Franz von Lobkowitz, at whose palace it was first performed.[citation needed]
The fourth movement of his Ninth Symphony features an elaborate choral setting of Schiller’s Ode An die Freude (“”Ode to Joy””), an optimistic hymn championing the brotherhood of humanity.”

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