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Four runs are scored in Cricket match when the ball hits St Lawrence

The St Lawrence Lime Tree was a 27-metre-high lime tree (90 ft) at the St Lawrence Ground in Canterbury, Kent, England. It was located within the boundary ropes of the cricket pitch which required special rules. In 2005, it was broken in two in high winds.

It is not known when the tree was first planted but it is known that it was already full-grown in its location in 1847, when the St Lawrence Ground was opened. The St Lawrence Ground was built around the tree, which was located within the boundary ropes. As a result of the St Lawrence Ground being the only first-class ground with a tree in the playing area, special laws were enacted regarding the tree. These laws may have been instigated pre-1910 where a Hampshire County Cricket Club batsman was claimed to be caught by a Kent County Cricket Club fielder off the tree. The laws stated that if the ball hit the tree, it

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was scored as a four even if it would have gone on to score six otherwise and no batsman could be caught out from a rebound off the tree. It was viewed as a challenge to hit a ball over the tree; only three batsmen, Learie Constantine, Jim Smith and Carl Hooper, managed to do so.