The Norman Invasion of England caused many noblemen to flee England

The Norman Invasion of England 1066 caused many English noblemen to flee England

The Norman Invasion of England 1066 caused many English noblemen to flee England for the Byzantine Empire (Modern day Turkey and Greece). There, the English diaspora founded the town, New York, 600 years before “New York” in America existed

Following the conquest large numbers of Anglo-Saxons, including groups of nobles, fled the country. Many went to Scotland, Ireland, or Scandinavia. Members of King Harold Godwinson’s family sought refuge in Ireland and used their bases in that country for unsuccessful invasions of England. The largest single exodus occurred in the 1070s, when a group of Anglo-Saxons in a fleet of 235 ships sailed for the Byzantine Empire. The empire became a popular destination for many English nobles and soldiers, as it would have been known that the Byzantines were in need of mercenaries. The English became the predominant element in the elite Varangian Guard, hitherto a largely Scandinavian unit, from which the emperor’s bodyguard was drawn. Some of the English migrants were settled in Byzantine frontier regions on the Black Sea coast, and established towns with names such as New London and New York

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