translator

The chief translator for the European Parliament, Ioannis Ikonomou

Did you know that the chief translator for the European Parliament, Ioannis Ikonomou, fluently speaks 32 languages.

  • Bulcsú László, a Croatian linguist, writer, translator, information scientist and accentologist, speaks more than 40 languages, including Akkadian, Hittite, Sumerian, Sanskrit, English, French, German, and Latin.
  • Ioannis Ikonomou (1964), Greek translator at the European Commission. He can speak 32 languages fluently.
  • Richard Simcott is a British polyglot who speaks 16 languages, including French, English, and Welsh.[24] He has studied over 30 languages and is referenced in a number of media articles.[25][26][27] He was named one of the most multilingual people from the United Kingdom by Harper-Collins to launch their competition to find the most multilingual student and child from the UK (See Alex Rawlings).[28] Simcott’s video on YouTube served as a source of inspiration for Tim Doner.[9] This connection between Doner and Simcott via the online community was one of the main themes running through Canada’s Global TV’s piece on hyperpolyglots on their 16×9 show, entitled “Word Play”.
  • Cesco Reale, an Italian polyglot speaking over 15 languages, including Esperanto, Mandarin Chinese and all main Romance languages. He holds the IPA certificate in phonetics, and is UN representative of the World Esperanto Association.
  • Benny Lewis, an Irish polyglot who, as of September 2013, speaks 12 languages following ten years of traveling the world. Lewis has presented two TEDx talks and maintains a language learning website.
  • Alex Rawlings, a 20-year-old undergraduate student at Oxford University, was named Britain’s “most multilingual student” in 2012 after being tested for fluency by native speakers in 11 languages: English, Greek, French, German, Italian, Dutch, Russian, Hebrew, Catalan, Spanish and Afrikaans.
  • Zdeno Chára is a Slovakian professional Ice Hockey player in the NHL who speaks seven languages. These are: Slovak, Czech, Polish, Swedish, Russian, German and English

 

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