Harry Potter

Harry Potter Social impacts

Harry Potter Social impacts. Although Time magazine named Rowling as a runner-up for its 2007 Person of the Year award, noting the social, moral, and political inspiration she has given her fandom, cultural comments on the series have been mixed. Washington Post book critic Ron Charles opined in July 2007 that the large numbers of adults reading the Potter series but few other books may represent a “bad case of cultural infantilism”, and that the straightforward “good vs. evil” theme of the series is “childish”. He also argued “through no fault of Rowling’s”, the cultural and marketing “hysteria” marked by the publication of the later books “trains children and adults to expect the roar of the coliseum, a mass-media experience that no other novel can possibly provide”.
Librarian Nancy Knapp pointed out the books’ potential to improve literacy by motivating children to read much more than they otherwise would. Agreeing about the motivating effects, Diane Penrod also praised the books’ blending of simple entertainment with “the qualities of highbrow literary fiction”, but expressed concern about the distracting effect of the prolific merchandising that accompanies the book launches.
Jennifer Conn used Snape’s and Quidditch coach Madam Hooch’s teaching methods as examples of what to avoid and what to emulate in clinical teaching, and Joyce Fields wrote that the books illustrate four of the five main topics in a typical first-year sociology class: “sociological concepts including culture, society, and socialisation; stratification and social inequality; social institutions; and social theory”.