40% of all humans have not lived beyond their first birthday

Estimates suggest that 40% of all humans to have ever existed have not lived beyond their first birthday

“The world population is the total number of living humans on Earth. As of today, it is estimated to number 7.094 billion by the United States Census Bureau (USCB). The USCB estimates that the world population exceeded 7 billion on March 12, 2012. According to a separate estimate by the United Nations Population Fund, it reached this milestone on October 31, 2011. The world population has experienced continuous growth since the end of the Great Famine and the Black Death in 1350, when it stood at around 370 million. The highest rates of growth – global population increases above 1.8% per year – were seen briefly during the 1950s, and for a longer period during the 1960s and 1970s. The growth rate peaked at 2.2% in 1963, then declined to 1.1% by 2011. Total annual births were highest in the late 1980s

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at about 138 million, and are now expected to remain essentially constant at their 2011 level of 134 million, while deaths number 56 million per year, and are expected to increase to 80 million per year by 2040. Current UN projections show a continued increase in population in the near future (but a steady decline in the population growth rate), with the global population expected to reach between 8.3 and 10.9 billion by 2050. Longer-term estimates by the United Nations Population Division range between 3.2 and 24.8 billion by 2150; mathematical modeling supports the lower estimate. Some analysts have questioned the sustainability of further world population growth, citing the growing pressures on the environment, global food supplies, and energy resources

Population by region
Six of Earth’s seven continents are permanently inhabited on a large scale. Asia is the most populous continent, with its 4.2 billion inhabitants accounting for over 60% of the world population. The world’s two most-populated countries alone, China and India, together constitute about 37% of the world’s population. Africa is the second-most-populated continent, with around 1 billion people, or 15% of the world’s population. Europe’s 733 million people make up 11% of the world’s population, while the Latin American and Caribbean regions are home to around 600 million (9%). Northern America, primarily consisting of the United States and Canada, has a population of around 352 million (5%), and Oceania, the least-populated region, has about 35 million inhabitants (0.5%). Though it is not permanently inhabited by any fixed population, Antarctica has a small, fluctuating international population, based mainly in polar science stations. This population tends to rise in the summer months and decrease significantly in winter, as visiting researchers return to their home countries.”

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