Jodrell Bank Observatory astronomers spotted an object unknown object

Jodrell Bank Observatory astronomers spotted an object unknown object

In April 2010 radio astronomers working at the Jodrell Bank Observatory spotted an unknown object in the galaxy M82 sending radio signals and the emission was never seen before in the universe,and the object was moving 4 times faster than the speed of light

“Messier 82 (also known as NGC 3034, Cigar Galaxy or M82) is the prototype nearby starburst galaxy about 12 million light-years away in the constellation Ursa Major. The starburst galaxy is five times brighter than the whole Milky Way and one hundred times brighter than our galaxy’s center. In 2005, the Hubble Space Telescope revealed 197 young massive clusters in the starburst core. The average mass of these clusters is around 2×105 M, hence the starburst core is a very energetic and high-density environment. Throughout the galaxy’s center, young stars are being born 10 times faster than they are inside our entire Milky Way Galaxy.

Jodrell Bank Observatory astronomers spotted an object unknown object

M82 was previously believed to be an irregular galaxy. However, in 2005, two symmetric spiral arms were discovered in the near-infrared (NIR) images of M82. The arms were detected by subtracting an axisymmetric exponential disk from the NIR images. These arms emanate from the ends of the NIR bar and can be followed for the length of 3 disc scales. Even though the arms were detected in the NIR images, they are bluer than the disk. Assuming that the northern part of M82 is nearer to us, which most literature assumes, the observed sense of rotation implies trailing arms. Due to M82’s high disk surface brightness, nearly edge-on orientation (~80°) with respect to us, and the presence of a complex network of dusty filaments in optical images, the arms were not previously detected. Starburst region[edit]In the core of M82, the active starburst region spans a diameter of 500 pc. In optical, there are four high surface brightness regions or clumps (designated A, C, D, and E). These clumps correspond to known sources at X-ray,infrared, and radio frequencies. Consequently, they are thought to be the least obscured starburst clusters from our vantage point. M82’s unique bipolar outflow (or ‘superwind’) appears to be concentrated on clumps A and C and fueled by

Jodrell Bank Observatory astronomers spotted an object unknown objectthe energy injected by supernova that occur about once every ten years. The Chandra X-ray Observatory detected fluctuating X-ray emissions from a location approximately 600 light-years away from the center of M82. Astronomers have postulated that this fluctuating emission comes from the first knownintermediate-mass black hole, of roughly 200 to 5000 solar masses. M82, like most galaxies, hosts a supermassive black hole at its center with a mass of approximately 3 x 107 solar masses as measured from stellar dynamics.Unknown Object[edit]In April 2010, radio astronomers working at the Jodrell Bank Observatory of the University of Manchester reported an unknown object in M82. The object started sending out radio waves, and the emission did not look like anything seen anywhere in the universe before. There have been several theories about the nature of this unknown object, but currently no theory entirely fits the observed data. It has been suggested that the object could be a “”micro quasar””, having very high radio luminosity yet low X-ray luminosity, and being fairly stable. However, all known microquasars produce large quantities of X-rays, whereas the object’s X-ray flux is below the measurement threshold. The object is located at several arcseconds from the center of M82. It has an apparent superluminal motion of 4 times the speed of light relative to the galaxy center”

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