Marble

There are 21 different historically notable marble varieties

Marble is a non-foliated metamorphic rock composed of recrystallized carbonate minerals, most commonly calcite or dolomite.  it is commonly used for sculpture and as a building material.

It is a rock resulting from metamorphism of sedimentary carbonate rocks, most commonly limestone or dolomite rock. Metamorphism causes variable recrystallization of the original carbonate mineral grains. The resulting marble-rock is typically composed of an interlocking mosaic of carbonate crystals. Primary sedimentary textures and structures of the original carbonate rock (protolith) have typically been modified or destroyed.

Marble

Pure white marble is the result of metamorphism of a very pure (silicate-poor) limestone or dolomite protolith. The characteristic swirls and veins of many colored varieties are usually due to various mineral impurities such as clay, silt, sand, iron oxides, or chert which were originally present as grains or layers in the limestone. Green coloration is often due to serpentine resulting from originally high magnesium limestone or dolostone with silica impurities. These various impurities have been mobilized and recrystallized by the intense pressure and heat of the metamorphism.

Examples of historically notable marble varieties and locations:

Marble Color Location Country
Carrara marble white or blue-gray Carrara Italy
Al-Andalus marble Red Malaga Spain
Black marble Black, white veins Tongshan County, Hubei China
Costa Sol marble Bronze Malaga Spain
San Cristobal Ivory Cream Beige Teba Spain
Connemara marble green Connemara Ireland
Creole marble white and blue/black Pickens County, Georgia United States
Etowah marble pink, salmon, rose Pickens County, Georgia United States
Murphy marble white Pickens and Gilmer Counties, Georgia United States
Parian marble pure-white, fine-grained Island of Paros Greece
Pentelic marble pure-white, fine-grained semitranslucent Penteliko MountainAthens Greece
Purbeck marble Gray/brown Isle of Purbeck United Kingdom
Ruskeala marble white near Ruskeala, Karelia Russia
Rușchița marble white, pinkish, reddish RușchițaCaraș-Severin CountyPoiana Rusca Mountains Romania
Sienna marble yellow with violet, red, blue or white veins near SienaTuscany Italy
Bianco Sivec white near Prilep Republic of Macedonia
Swedish green marble green near KolmårdenSödermanland Sweden
Sylacauga marble white Talladega County, Alabama United States
Vermont marble white Proctor, Vermont United States
Yule marble uniform pure white near Marble, Colorado United States
Wunsiedel marble white Wunsiedel, Bavaria Germany

Marble in Cultures

Marble

As the favorite medium for Greek and Roman sculptors and architects (see classical sculpture), marble has become a cultural symbol of tradition and refined taste. Its extremely varied and colorful patterns make it a favorite decorative material, and it is often imitated in background patterns for computer displays, etc.

marble

Places named after the stone include Marblehead, Ohio; Marblehead, Massachusetts; Marble Arch, London; the Sea of Marmara; India’s Marble-Rocks; and the towns of Marble, Minnesota; Marble, Colorado; Marble Falls, Texas, and Marble Hill, Manhattan, New York. The Elgin Marbles are marble sculptures from the Parthenon that are on display in the British Museum. They were brought to Britain by the Earl of Elgin.

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