Mario was unintentionally named after the landlord of Nintendo

Mario was unintentionally named after the landlord of Nintendo of

Mario was unintentionally named after the landlord of Nintendo of America’s warehouse, who once barged in on a meeting to demand rent

After the commercial failure of Radar Scope, Nintendo’s company president referred to Shigeru Miyamoto to create an arcade game to save the company. Miyamoto came up with the idea of a game in which the playable character has to make his way through an obstacle course consisting of sloped platforms, ladders and rolling barrels. Miyamoto named the game Donkey Kong, and its main protagonist “Jumpman”. Donkey Kong is an early example of the platform genre. In addition to presenting the goal of saving the Lady, the game also gives the player a score. Points are awarded for finishing screens; leaping over obstacles; destroying objects with a hammer power-up; collecting items such as hats, parasols, and purses (presumably belonging to the Lady/Pauline); and completing other tasks. The game was surprisingly successful.[1] “Jumpman” was called “Mario” in certain promotional materials for the game’s release overseas;[2][3] his namesake was Mario Segale, the landlord of Nintendo of America’s office/warehouse, who barged in on a meeting to demand an overdue rent payment.[4][5] Eventually Jumpman’s name was internationally and permanently changed to Mario. The success of the game spawned several ports, and a sequel, Donkey Kong Jr., which is Mario’s only appearance as an antagonist. Donkey Kong 3 did not feature Mario. Donkey Kong has established his own unique franchise outside the Mario universe, starting with Donkey Kong Country and has spawned many sequels and spin-offs