In Saudi Arabia women are allowed to fly aircraft but not a car

In Saudi Arabia women are allowed to fly aircraft but not a car

In Saudi Arabia women are allowed to fly aircraft, though they must be chauffeured to the airport because it’s illegal for them to drive a car

Saudi Arabian law does not recognize religious freedom, and the public practice of non-Muslim religions is actively prohibited. No law specifically requires citizens to be Muslims, but article 12.4 of the Naturalization Law requires that applicants attest to their religious affiliation, and article 14.1 requires that applicants to get a certificate endorsed by their local cleric. The Government has declared the Quran and the Sunna (tradition) of the Prophet Muhammad to be the country’s constitution. Neither the Government nor society in general accepts the concepts of separation of religion and state, and such separation does not exist. The legal system is based on Sharia (Islamic law), with Shari’a courts basing their judgments largely on a code derived from the Quran and the Sunna. The Government permits Shi’a Muslims to use their own legal tradition to adjudicate noncriminal cases within their community.
Under Pope Benedict XVI, Vatican officials have raised the issue of Christians being forbidden from worshipping openly in Saudi Arabia. As an Islamic State, Saudi Arabia gives preferential treatment for Muslims. During Ramadan, eating, drinking, or smoking in public during daylight hours is not allowed. Foreign schools are often required to teach a yearly introductory segment on Islam. Saudi religious police have detained Shi’ite pilgrims participating in the Hajj, allegedly calling them “”infidels in Mecca””. The restrictions on the Shi’a branch of Islam in the Kingdom along with the banning of displaying Jewish, Hindu and Christian symbols have been referred to as apartheid.
The Saudi government has gone further than stopping Christians from worshipping in publicly designated buildings to even raid private prayer meetings among Christian believers in their own homes. On December 15, 2011, Saudi security forces arrested 35 Ethiopian Christians in Jeddah who were praying in a home, beating them and threatening them with death. When the Ethiopian workers’ employers asked security forces for what reason they were arrested, they said “”for practising Christianity””. Later, under mounting international pressure, this charge was changed to “”mixing with the opposite sex””. The freedom of religion, including the freedom of assembling together to worship and pray, is a basic right recognised under international human rights law.
In December of 2012, Saudi religious police detained more than 41 individuals after storming a house in the Saudi Arabian province of al-Jouf. They were accused of “plotting to celebrate Christmas,” according to a December 26 statement released by the police branch”

In Saudi Arabia women are allowed to fly aircraft but not a car

Read more