Solar eclipse of August 21, 2017

Solar eclipse of August 21, 2017

A total solar eclipse will take place on Monday, August 21, 2017. A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes between Earth and the Sun, thereby totally or partly obscuring the image of the Sun for a viewer on Earth. A total solar eclipse occurs when the Moon’s apparent diameter is larger than the Sun, blocking all direct sunlight, turning day into darkness. Totality occurs in a narrow path across the surface of the Earth, while a partial solar eclipse will be visible over a region thousands of kilometres wide.

The eclipse will have a magnitude of 1.0306 and will be visible from a narrow corridor through the United States. The longest duration of totality will be 2 minutes 40 seconds at 36°58.5′N 87°39.3′W in the Bainbridge/Sinking Fork area of Christian County, Kentucky just northwest of Hopkinsville, Kentucky. This center is located on a historical farm named Orchard Dale.

A partial solar eclipse will be seen from the much broader path of the Moon’s penumbra, including all of North America, northern South America, western Europe, and Africa.

This eclipse is the 22nd of the 77 members of Saros series 145, the one that also produced the solar eclipse of August 11, 1999. Members of this series are increasing in duration. The longest eclipse in this series will occur on June 25, 2522 and last for 7 minutes and 12 seconds.

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