South Pole

The Amundsen–Scott South Pole Station have a tradition of watching The Thing

The South Pole experiences a 6-month period of darkness, during which scientists at the Amundsen–Scott South Pole Station have a tradition of watching The Thing, a movie about a humanoid alien who attacks an Arctic research outpost.

During the summer the station population is typically over 200. Most personnel leave by the middle of February, leaving a few dozen (47 in 2010) “winter-overs”, mostly support staff plus a few scientists, who keep the station functional through the months of Antarctic night. The winter personnel are isolated between mid-February and late October. Wintering-over presents notorious dangers and stresses, as the station population is almost totally isolated. The station is completely self-sufficient during the winter, and powered by three generators running on JP-8 jet fuel. An annual tradition is a back to back viewing of The Thing from Another World, The Thing (1982), and The Thing (2011) after the last flight has left for the winter.

South Pole

Research at the station includes glaciology, geophysics, meteorology, upper atmosphere physics, astronomy, astrophysics, and biomedical studies. In recent years, most of the winter scientists have worked for the IceCube Neutrino Observatory or for low-frequency astronomy experiments such as the South Pole Telescope and BICEP2. The low temperature and low moisture content of the polar air, combined with the altitude of over 2743 m (9,000 ft), causes the air to be far more transparent on some frequencies than is typical elsewhere, and the months of darkness permit sensitive equipment to run constantly.

South Pole

There is a small greenhouse at the station. The variety of vegetables and herbs in the greenhouse, which range from fresh eggplant to jalapeños, are all produced hydroponically, using only water and nutrients and no soil. The greenhouse is the only source of fresh fruit and vegetables during the winter.

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